Contract - 2014 Designer of the Year: Krista Ninivaggi

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2014 Designer of the Year: Krista Ninivaggi

25 January, 2014

-By John Czarnecki


Until this decade, SHoP Architects had been celebrated for its body of work in architecture and urban design, not necessarily interiors. But that has changed. SHoP now boasts interior design as one of its areas of expertise, and that is thanks largely to Krista Ninivaggi.

SHoP Architects has rapidly built a reputation as one of the most influential New York architecture firms of the 21st Century, and its work is now known internationally. Founded in the late 1990s by five Columbia University architecture classmates, the firm has now grown to about 160 employees, and is recognized for work such as the zinc-clad Porter House on Ninth Avenue in New York, an office for Google, and large-scale urban design projects, such as the East River Esplanade that is redefining Lower Manhattan’s connection to the water. In 2009, the firm won the National Design Award in Architecture Design from the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.

That same year, the recession slowed the entire architecture and design industry, and SHoP focused on planning for its future. It had already begun SHoP Construction in 2007, and ventured into other areas such as sustainable technology research. While the firm had completed interiors for some buildings that it had designed, the firm’s calling card was not interior design. With this in mind, and to avoid having clients turn to other firms to design the interiors of a SHoP building, the firm aimed to make interiors a part of its full-service scope.

Krista Ninivaggi - Contract magazine's 2014 Designer of the Year from Contract Magazine on Vimeo.

SHoP founding principal Gregg Pasquarelli explains: “While we had done some interiors as primarily an architecture firm, interior design is really just a different skill set. And there needs to be that ability to connect on different levels, rather than just thinking about the building. We knew that we had to bring in some talent to help us move to the next level. When SHoP decided to really invest in an interiors department and to grow that business, it was clear to me and my partners that there was one person we wanted to lead that practice.”

That person was Krista Ninivaggi, who has quickly developed a SHoP interiors team virtually from scratch since her start in January 2011 after years of experience at AvroKO and Rockwell Group. With SHoP, she has accomplished a great deal—building an interiors staff from a dozen designers last summer to 20 now and likely 30 later this year, and leading the design of the interiors of Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Shopbop headquarters in Manhattan, projects in Botswana and Washington, D.C., as well as the firm’s own new office in the Woolworth Building.

SHoP’s leadership has entrusted Ninivaggi, who is in her 30s, to guide the firm’s interior design business, and that move has proven to be an incredibly intelligent one. SHoP is now a major player in the business of interior design, and that was not the case just a few years ago. With verve and style, and a business-savvy moxy, Ninivaggi has single-handedly made certain that interior design is of equal importance to architecture, urban design, and construction at SHoP. The firm is now becoming known for its well-executed interiors that are not prescribed or predictable in type or aesthetic.

For her accomplishments, Contract names Krista Ninivaggi as the 2014 Designer of the Year. She is the 35th winner of the award.

Scripting the night
“I’m a proud Jersey girl,” Ninivaggi says, “but I was always incredibly attracted to the city.” She grew up in New Jersey, just outside of New York, but knew that the city would be her home. After internships at the Guggenheim Museum and Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects, she graduated from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) with both Bachelor of Fine Art and Bachelor of Architecture degrees and moved to New York permanently. She enjoyed the nightlife of the city, which translated into a love affair with hospitality design.

“I started going to places that were fantasy worlds that had been designed by David Rockwell and other well-known designers. I wanted to create these spaces; it was not enough for me just to be there,” Ninivaggi says. “I knew that I wanted to script the night. I wanted people to hang out in my vision of what an evening out in New York should look like.” Focusing on getting a start in hospitality design, she applied to Rockwell’s office. Although the post-9/11 economy was challenging in New York, Ninivaggi’s tenacity paid off and she began at Rockwell Group in fall 2002 and remained for more than three years.

There, learning from Rockwell, as well as principal Shawn Sullivan and other designers, Ninivaggi became entrenched in the world of hospitality interiors. It also happens to be where she met her husband, William Prince, who was a colleague. “It was the best first job I could have ever hoped for,” she says. “The most important thing I learned there was the experience—the theater of the whole event. And I really learned how to do that in a controlled and subtle way that creates a wonderful and full experience for the guests.”

That fantasy or theatrical aspect of designing a space is apparent in two restaurant projects that she had a hand in while with Rockwell Group—Bobby Flay Steak in The Borgata Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, and Nobu Fifty Seven in New York. Ninivaggi credits Rockwell, who was the 1998 Designer of the Year, for giving her career a significant start. “David created hospitality design.

I think he is phenomenal and very inspiring and was just lovely to work with.” In 2006, Ninivaggi left Rockwell Group to work briefly with a design consultancy before joining the New York firm AvroKO, which was making a name for itself in hospitality design. Led by four partners—Greg Bradshaw, Adam Farmerie, William Harris, and Kristina O’Neal—the firm grew from 10 people to about 40 by the time Ninivaggi left in late 2010.

“She was definitely a star with us,” Bradshaw says. “Krista was good at everything—a good designer and collaborator, and good with strategy to pull everything together. I had an immediate confidence in her from the moment she came to the firm.”
“I learned how to do high-concept interiors with AvroKO,” Ninivaggi says. “It was where I started to grow and mature as a designer and a design professional. I love the partners at AvroKO, and I got to work closely with all of them. They are all lovely people who are infinitely creative and so good at what they do. And since the office was relatively small when I started, I was able to take on a lot of responsibility.”

At AvroKO, Ninivaggi spent considerable time working on a project that ultimately did not get built due to the recession: a proposed W Hotel in Philadelphia. But she did complete notable interiors, including Park Avenue Café, a restaurant that has an interior that changes with each of the four seasons, for restaurateur Alan Stillman and his son, Michael. “I remember the first meeting with Michael and Alan Stillman, and Michael started to tell us about this idea, and I was instantly excited about the possibilities,” Ninivaggi says. “What an amazing design challenge to solve. We essentially created four different restaurants in one, and we did not lose a single seat in any of the designs.”

Ninivaggi also designed the interiors for Lily & Bloom, a restaurant in Hong Kong, while part of the  AvroKO team. “It was the first construction project that I had done overseas, and the schedule was incredibly compressed—design through construction in just over six months,” she says.

“And yet the project turned out beautifully. We were working with a great client and established connections with factories in mainland China. Nearly every element in the restaurant—including all the tiles and furniture—was custom fabricated for us. We designed every inch of that space.” Having grown as a designer at AvroKO—even hiring and mentoring many of the firm’s new designers—Ninivaggi was beckoned by the opportunity to lead the interiors team at SHoP in late 2010. She says it was difficult to leave, but she had the support of the AvroKO partners. Bradshaw says, “I knew it was a great opportunity for her.”

Softball and SHoP
As the story goes, softball played an integral role in Ninivaggi landing at SHoP. While at Rockwell Group, Ninivaggi and Prince were instrumental in establishing a softball team for the firm. Rockwell Group was collaborating with SHoP on a project at the time. “We put a team together at Rockwell, and  we challenged SHoP to a game,” Ninivaggi says.

“I kept in touch and got the know the partners at SHoP through the league. By the summer of 2010, after the games, Gregg Pasquarelli, in particular, started to ask me questions at the bar about how to start interiors at SHoP. We had numerous discussions about this, and I had lots of opinions about who they needed to hire, and how they should structure it, and how it should integrate with the architecture side.”

Those after-softball chats led to meetings with the rest of the SHoP principals, and Ninivaggi’s point of view on interiors left an impression. “I very clearly remember when we were talking with Krista about her coming on, she said, ‘I’m really interested in doing this because I don’t know what a SHoP interior would be,’” Pasquarelli says. “And that was, to me, the exact right attitude. It’s the process of design—not just a replicated image of a space.”

Ninivaggi was hired, and took on her new role at SHoP with vigor. While she arrived with considerable experience in hospitality interiors, she was asked to lead an interiors effort across multiple project types. “As the director of interiors, I was tasked to create what that role would be. What kind of services would we offer to our clients, how would we do interiors, what would our processes be? When I started to develop the different systems and processes that we would use to do our interior design work, I had to take into account the different typologies that we do in the office,” Ninivaggi says. “We are doing education, office design, hospitality, multi-family residential, and entertainment. And we are doing it under one umbrella in the interior design studio, working closely with the architects.”

Pasquarelli is quick to identify the impact Ninivaggi has had. “You can see the effects on our firm as a whole, and the gaining of new techniques and abilities and skills,” he says. “It has been really  exciting to have that come together, and to have Krista lead that so successfully.” When Ninivaggi arrived at SHoP, she was quickly immersed into developing the interiors for Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the new arena and home of the Brooklyn Nets that SHoP designed for Forest City Ratner Companies and the Nets.

Her influence is evident in the concourses, suites, the Calvin Klein Courtside Club, and the 40/40 Club, and ranged from designing bespoke furniture to specifying lighting, furnishings, and finishes. She even designed new concessions carts clad in teak wood, unusual for an arena. Overall, the space reflects the grittiness of Brooklyn, with an interplay of lightness and darkness, while also meeting the needs of the thousands of people who use the spaces—from basketball fans to concertgoers to children going to Disney on Ice.

Ninivaggi’s client group for Barclays Center included Jay-Z, who owned shares of both the Brooklyn Nets and the arena itself. He was especially influential in the design of the 40/40 Club and The Vault suites. The Vault—comprised of 11 private suites with lounge seating and a gold-and-black color palette surrounding a champagne bar—was designed as an elite, premium-level club. Digitally-fabricated pendant lights in The Vault (pictured with Ninivaggi on the cover) were designed by Ninivaggi and colleague Wontae Yang. Ninivaggi recalls working with Jay-Z’s team: “We would send the renderings off, and they would always come back and say ‘it’s not gold enough, it’s not warm enough,’ and we worked very closely to develop the look and feel of this space so that it is warm and welcoming.”

Winthrop Hoyt, vice president at Forest City Ratner Companies, praised Ninivaggi for her collaboration on the Barclays Center interiors. “Krista was an ideal design partner,” he says. “With Krista’s team, the Barclays Center not only benefitted from the refined design aesthetic, but also from a profound attention to detail—from her first design presentation until the project was complete. She put a high-style spin on a scope that, in most sports buildings, is far more workaday. Krista was as vested in the ultimate success of the project as we were.”

Anything but cookie-cutter
Another key SHoP interior that Ninivaggi designed is the office of the online retailer Shopbop in New York. For the space, her team created flexibility so that the office can be reconfigured in many ways. “We pulled a lot of the concept from the Shopbop brand book, and we created a loft-like, bohemian, but feminine space,” Ninivaggi says. “We carefully inserted some industrial texture and materials, but did it in a way that would feel warm.”

One of her first international projects for SHoP is the Botswana Innovation Hub, a research facility currently under construction. The project, designed to be very sustainable and embrace the region’s geography, includes an HIV research lab, a data center, and engineering floors. “For the interiors, we used a lot of natural surfaces and materials to extend the idea that the interiors were a part of this concept of the dune and the delta. And we also worked with the local craftspeople [in the design process].”
In 2014, Ninivaggi is leading the interior design for a restaurant in TriBeCa in Manhattan, high-end condominium interiors, a hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and the office of the law firm Kirkland & Ellis in Washington, D.C., among other projects.

“The law firm wanted something totally out of the box. It’s great to work with people who don’t want what everyone else has done,” Ninivaggi says. “What really excites me about SHoP is that we do not specialize in any one type of design. The client is going to get something that is completely fresh and incredibly thoughtful, and we are going to go on a journey with them. We are going to figure out who that client is, what their needs are, and we are not going to be doing anything cookie-cutter.”
As SHoP grows its interiors practice, Ninivaggi’s ability to guide and mentor young designers will be critical. Coren Sharples, one of the SHoP founding principals, says Ninivaggi is ideally suited for that role. “We want the interiors practice to be true to the DNA of our firm. We’re problem solvers, thinking outside the box,” Sharples says. “Krista brings a real wealth of knowledge to the firm. The strength of this office lies in our staff, and she’s a great leader and mentor.”

Ninivaggi gives her team and colleagues considerable credit. “Really, the heart of what we do is coming out of the design team,” Ninivaggi says. “I like to give all my designers a chance to exercise their design muscles, to show themselves, to really sparkle, and to take the opportunity to create amazing things in these spaces. My team is the most important thing to me about my position at SHoP. I would be nothing without them.”




2014 Designer of the Year: Krista Ninivaggi

25 January, 2014


Until this decade, SHoP Architects had been celebrated for its body of work in architecture and urban design, not necessarily interiors. But that has changed. SHoP now boasts interior design as one of its areas of expertise, and that is thanks largely to Krista Ninivaggi.

SHoP Architects has rapidly built a reputation as one of the most influential New York architecture firms of the 21st Century, and its work is now known internationally. Founded in the late 1990s by five Columbia University architecture classmates, the firm has now grown to about 160 employees, and is recognized for work such as the zinc-clad Porter House on Ninth Avenue in New York, an office for Google, and large-scale urban design projects, such as the East River Esplanade that is redefining Lower Manhattan’s connection to the water. In 2009, the firm won the National Design Award in Architecture Design from the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.

That same year, the recession slowed the entire architecture and design industry, and SHoP focused on planning for its future. It had already begun SHoP Construction in 2007, and ventured into other areas such as sustainable technology research. While the firm had completed interiors for some buildings that it had designed, the firm’s calling card was not interior design. With this in mind, and to avoid having clients turn to other firms to design the interiors of a SHoP building, the firm aimed to make interiors a part of its full-service scope.

Krista Ninivaggi - Contract magazine's 2014 Designer of the Year from Contract Magazine on Vimeo.

SHoP founding principal Gregg Pasquarelli explains: “While we had done some interiors as primarily an architecture firm, interior design is really just a different skill set. And there needs to be that ability to connect on different levels, rather than just thinking about the building. We knew that we had to bring in some talent to help us move to the next level. When SHoP decided to really invest in an interiors department and to grow that business, it was clear to me and my partners that there was one person we wanted to lead that practice.”

That person was Krista Ninivaggi, who has quickly developed a SHoP interiors team virtually from scratch since her start in January 2011 after years of experience at AvroKO and Rockwell Group. With SHoP, she has accomplished a great deal—building an interiors staff from a dozen designers last summer to 20 now and likely 30 later this year, and leading the design of the interiors of Barclays Center in Brooklyn, Shopbop headquarters in Manhattan, projects in Botswana and Washington, D.C., as well as the firm’s own new office in the Woolworth Building.

SHoP’s leadership has entrusted Ninivaggi, who is in her 30s, to guide the firm’s interior design business, and that move has proven to be an incredibly intelligent one. SHoP is now a major player in the business of interior design, and that was not the case just a few years ago. With verve and style, and a business-savvy moxy, Ninivaggi has single-handedly made certain that interior design is of equal importance to architecture, urban design, and construction at SHoP. The firm is now becoming known for its well-executed interiors that are not prescribed or predictable in type or aesthetic.

For her accomplishments, Contract names Krista Ninivaggi as the 2014 Designer of the Year. She is the 35th winner of the award.

Scripting the night
“I’m a proud Jersey girl,” Ninivaggi says, “but I was always incredibly attracted to the city.” She grew up in New Jersey, just outside of New York, but knew that the city would be her home. After internships at the Guggenheim Museum and Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects, she graduated from Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) with both Bachelor of Fine Art and Bachelor of Architecture degrees and moved to New York permanently. She enjoyed the nightlife of the city, which translated into a love affair with hospitality design.

“I started going to places that were fantasy worlds that had been designed by David Rockwell and other well-known designers. I wanted to create these spaces; it was not enough for me just to be there,” Ninivaggi says. “I knew that I wanted to script the night. I wanted people to hang out in my vision of what an evening out in New York should look like.” Focusing on getting a start in hospitality design, she applied to Rockwell’s office. Although the post-9/11 economy was challenging in New York, Ninivaggi’s tenacity paid off and she began at Rockwell Group in fall 2002 and remained for more than three years.

There, learning from Rockwell, as well as principal Shawn Sullivan and other designers, Ninivaggi became entrenched in the world of hospitality interiors. It also happens to be where she met her husband, William Prince, who was a colleague. “It was the best first job I could have ever hoped for,” she says. “The most important thing I learned there was the experience—the theater of the whole event. And I really learned how to do that in a controlled and subtle way that creates a wonderful and full experience for the guests.”

That fantasy or theatrical aspect of designing a space is apparent in two restaurant projects that she had a hand in while with Rockwell Group—Bobby Flay Steak in The Borgata Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, and Nobu Fifty Seven in New York. Ninivaggi credits Rockwell, who was the 1998 Designer of the Year, for giving her career a significant start. “David created hospitality design.

I think he is phenomenal and very inspiring and was just lovely to work with.” In 2006, Ninivaggi left Rockwell Group to work briefly with a design consultancy before joining the New York firm AvroKO, which was making a name for itself in hospitality design. Led by four partners—Greg Bradshaw, Adam Farmerie, William Harris, and Kristina O’Neal—the firm grew from 10 people to about 40 by the time Ninivaggi left in late 2010.

“She was definitely a star with us,” Bradshaw says. “Krista was good at everything—a good designer and collaborator, and good with strategy to pull everything together. I had an immediate confidence in her from the moment she came to the firm.”
“I learned how to do high-concept interiors with AvroKO,” Ninivaggi says. “It was where I started to grow and mature as a designer and a design professional. I love the partners at AvroKO, and I got to work closely with all of them. They are all lovely people who are infinitely creative and so good at what they do. And since the office was relatively small when I started, I was able to take on a lot of responsibility.”

At AvroKO, Ninivaggi spent considerable time working on a project that ultimately did not get built due to the recession: a proposed W Hotel in Philadelphia. But she did complete notable interiors, including Park Avenue Café, a restaurant that has an interior that changes with each of the four seasons, for restaurateur Alan Stillman and his son, Michael. “I remember the first meeting with Michael and Alan Stillman, and Michael started to tell us about this idea, and I was instantly excited about the possibilities,” Ninivaggi says. “What an amazing design challenge to solve. We essentially created four different restaurants in one, and we did not lose a single seat in any of the designs.”

Ninivaggi also designed the interiors for Lily & Bloom, a restaurant in Hong Kong, while part of the  AvroKO team. “It was the first construction project that I had done overseas, and the schedule was incredibly compressed—design through construction in just over six months,” she says.

“And yet the project turned out beautifully. We were working with a great client and established connections with factories in mainland China. Nearly every element in the restaurant—including all the tiles and furniture—was custom fabricated for us. We designed every inch of that space.” Having grown as a designer at AvroKO—even hiring and mentoring many of the firm’s new designers—Ninivaggi was beckoned by the opportunity to lead the interiors team at SHoP in late 2010. She says it was difficult to leave, but she had the support of the AvroKO partners. Bradshaw says, “I knew it was a great opportunity for her.”

Softball and SHoP
As the story goes, softball played an integral role in Ninivaggi landing at SHoP. While at Rockwell Group, Ninivaggi and Prince were instrumental in establishing a softball team for the firm. Rockwell Group was collaborating with SHoP on a project at the time. “We put a team together at Rockwell, and  we challenged SHoP to a game,” Ninivaggi says.

“I kept in touch and got the know the partners at SHoP through the league. By the summer of 2010, after the games, Gregg Pasquarelli, in particular, started to ask me questions at the bar about how to start interiors at SHoP. We had numerous discussions about this, and I had lots of opinions about who they needed to hire, and how they should structure it, and how it should integrate with the architecture side.”

Those after-softball chats led to meetings with the rest of the SHoP principals, and Ninivaggi’s point of view on interiors left an impression. “I very clearly remember when we were talking with Krista about her coming on, she said, ‘I’m really interested in doing this because I don’t know what a SHoP interior would be,’” Pasquarelli says. “And that was, to me, the exact right attitude. It’s the process of design—not just a replicated image of a space.”

Ninivaggi was hired, and took on her new role at SHoP with vigor. While she arrived with considerable experience in hospitality interiors, she was asked to lead an interiors effort across multiple project types. “As the director of interiors, I was tasked to create what that role would be. What kind of services would we offer to our clients, how would we do interiors, what would our processes be? When I started to develop the different systems and processes that we would use to do our interior design work, I had to take into account the different typologies that we do in the office,” Ninivaggi says. “We are doing education, office design, hospitality, multi-family residential, and entertainment. And we are doing it under one umbrella in the interior design studio, working closely with the architects.”

Pasquarelli is quick to identify the impact Ninivaggi has had. “You can see the effects on our firm as a whole, and the gaining of new techniques and abilities and skills,” he says. “It has been really  exciting to have that come together, and to have Krista lead that so successfully.” When Ninivaggi arrived at SHoP, she was quickly immersed into developing the interiors for Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the new arena and home of the Brooklyn Nets that SHoP designed for Forest City Ratner Companies and the Nets.

Her influence is evident in the concourses, suites, the Calvin Klein Courtside Club, and the 40/40 Club, and ranged from designing bespoke furniture to specifying lighting, furnishings, and finishes. She even designed new concessions carts clad in teak wood, unusual for an arena. Overall, the space reflects the grittiness of Brooklyn, with an interplay of lightness and darkness, while also meeting the needs of the thousands of people who use the spaces—from basketball fans to concertgoers to children going to Disney on Ice.

Ninivaggi’s client group for Barclays Center included Jay-Z, who owned shares of both the Brooklyn Nets and the arena itself. He was especially influential in the design of the 40/40 Club and The Vault suites. The Vault—comprised of 11 private suites with lounge seating and a gold-and-black color palette surrounding a champagne bar—was designed as an elite, premium-level club. Digitally-fabricated pendant lights in The Vault (pictured with Ninivaggi on the cover) were designed by Ninivaggi and colleague Wontae Yang. Ninivaggi recalls working with Jay-Z’s team: “We would send the renderings off, and they would always come back and say ‘it’s not gold enough, it’s not warm enough,’ and we worked very closely to develop the look and feel of this space so that it is warm and welcoming.”

Winthrop Hoyt, vice president at Forest City Ratner Companies, praised Ninivaggi for her collaboration on the Barclays Center interiors. “Krista was an ideal design partner,” he says. “With Krista’s team, the Barclays Center not only benefitted from the refined design aesthetic, but also from a profound attention to detail—from her first design presentation until the project was complete. She put a high-style spin on a scope that, in most sports buildings, is far more workaday. Krista was as vested in the ultimate success of the project as we were.”

Anything but cookie-cutter
Another key SHoP interior that Ninivaggi designed is the office of the online retailer Shopbop in New York. For the space, her team created flexibility so that the office can be reconfigured in many ways. “We pulled a lot of the concept from the Shopbop brand book, and we created a loft-like, bohemian, but feminine space,” Ninivaggi says. “We carefully inserted some industrial texture and materials, but did it in a way that would feel warm.”

One of her first international projects for SHoP is the Botswana Innovation Hub, a research facility currently under construction. The project, designed to be very sustainable and embrace the region’s geography, includes an HIV research lab, a data center, and engineering floors. “For the interiors, we used a lot of natural surfaces and materials to extend the idea that the interiors were a part of this concept of the dune and the delta. And we also worked with the local craftspeople [in the design process].”
In 2014, Ninivaggi is leading the interior design for a restaurant in TriBeCa in Manhattan, high-end condominium interiors, a hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and the office of the law firm Kirkland & Ellis in Washington, D.C., among other projects.

“The law firm wanted something totally out of the box. It’s great to work with people who don’t want what everyone else has done,” Ninivaggi says. “What really excites me about SHoP is that we do not specialize in any one type of design. The client is going to get something that is completely fresh and incredibly thoughtful, and we are going to go on a journey with them. We are going to figure out who that client is, what their needs are, and we are not going to be doing anything cookie-cutter.”
As SHoP grows its interiors practice, Ninivaggi’s ability to guide and mentor young designers will be critical. Coren Sharples, one of the SHoP founding principals, says Ninivaggi is ideally suited for that role. “We want the interiors practice to be true to the DNA of our firm. We’re problem solvers, thinking outside the box,” Sharples says. “Krista brings a real wealth of knowledge to the firm. The strength of this office lies in our staff, and she’s a great leader and mentor.”

Ninivaggi gives her team and colleagues considerable credit. “Really, the heart of what we do is coming out of the design team,” Ninivaggi says. “I like to give all my designers a chance to exercise their design muscles, to show themselves, to really sparkle, and to take the opportunity to create amazing things in these spaces. My team is the most important thing to me about my position at SHoP. I would be nothing without them.”

 


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