Contract - Community Asset: L.B. Landry High School by Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

design - features - education design



Community Asset: L.B. Landry High School by Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

14 March, 2011

-By Jean Nayar


Five years after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, and flooded 80 percent of the city and virtually destroyed its public school system, it is heartening to see the new beginnings that are emerging in the wake of the devastation. One inspiring fresh start is the reconstruction of the L.B. Landry High School in a working-class neighborhood of New Orleans. Designed by New Orleans-based architecture firm Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, the new school is one of five projects selected as part of the Louisiana Department of Education’s Recovery School District’s “Quick Start” program, which aimed to fast-forward the replacement of five damaged schools while the new comprehensive plan for the city’s school system was underway. Supported with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the brand new $54.8-million facility, which opened last August, not only promises to enhance the quality of education for the students, but also to improve the quality of life for the community.

Driven by a passionate community group, the proposal to rebuild L.B. Landry was the largest chosen to receive funding to rebuild from among approximately 70 applicants because of its place in New Orleans’ history. Although it hadn’t been destroyed by flooding, the original school—which was built in 1938 and was the first public school on New Orleans’ west bank that African Americans could attend—suffered wind damage, had deteriorated badly over the years, and was too small to accommodate its current and projected student body. But thanks to a committed alumni and neighborhood advocacy group, the 236,000-sq.-ft. school was rebuilt on its original site and now incorporates 50 percent more space than the old school.

Working with SHW, a Texas-based architecture firm specializing in education design, and program manager CSRS, Inc., Eskew+Dumez+Ripple designed the new school to meet the criteria of the Louisiana Recovery School District, which mandated contemporary standards for education planning and LEED Silver status for all schools. It also was designed with input from civic leaders to function as a community resource. “Beyond all of the curriculum components of the design, the community also wanted two gyms—one for competition and another for practice—as well as a health clinic and media center that would function as community resources after hours,” says architect Steve Dumez. As a result, in addition to expanded, up-to-date classroom spaces, the school now houses two new gymnasiums (one 1,000-seat, competition-size space and another 250-seat auxiliary gym); a 650-seat auditorium; a spacious cafeteria; performing arts spaces for dance, choir, and band rehearsal; and a black box theater, as well as a community health center and new public media space, both of which offer after-school access to the general public.

“The community was extremely supportive of Landry being rebuilt,” says Siona LaFrance, chief of staff for the Recovery School District. “Designed with the idea that parts of it would be accessible and available to the community, including the health clinic and recreational and performance space, it is considered a real asset to the community.”

To improve on the plan of the original two-story school, which was designed around a courtyard and closed on all four sides, the architects opted to preserve the original courtyard (including a very old magnolia tree), but replaced the former, donut-shaped plan with a U-shaped one to open the side of the facility facing L.B. Landry Avenue, a major thoroughfare to the west. “We wanted to open the heart of the school to the street so that students could see out to the world beyond and passersby could see in,” says Dumez. To make up for the loss of space along the open side of the school and expand the square footage, the architects created a three-story structure with two classroom wings for different grade levels on the sides and clustered the support and common spaces in the center. For easy access and security, the community health clinic and media center were located on the ground level of each of the classroom wings.

The orientation of the wings and the fenestration are part of a daylighting strategy designed to support the building’s sustainability objectives. “It was very important to bring daylight into the classrooms and common areas,” says architect Tracy Lea, “so the windows respond to solar orientation and allow the circulation and gathering areas to be as open and light as they can be while controlling heat gain.” Another eco-friendly feature—a pre-cast concrete storm water management basin that’s filled with horsetail reeds and gravel and doubles as outdoor seating adjacent to the courtyard—is one of many components that enable the building itself to become a teaching tool about sustainable design.

The community’s interest in durability and ease of maintenance influenced the materials choices for the building. “New Orleans Parish hadn’t built any new schools in a while, so there were no standards from an aesthetic perspective,” says Dumez. “Because L.B. Landry was one of the first schools coming out of the box, we were able to help established new standards.” Outside, masonry units from the ground level to the second floors and insulated metal wall panels above establish a crisp, tough shell. Inside, terrazzo floors, impact-resistant blue-tinted laminated glass window insets, and walls clad in durable yellow wallpaper printed with inspirational quotes from African American leaders brighten common areas with echoes of the original structure and the school’s blue and yellow colors. Since opening last summer, the new school quickly has become a source of a pride and a symbol of hope for a passionate community that respects its hardworking past and is committed to its successful future.


who
Client: Louisiana Recovery School38District. Architect, interior designer: Eskew+Dumez+Ripple; Steve Dumez, FAIA – Design Director; Tracy Lea, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Director; Randy Hutchison, Senior Designer/Contract Administrator; Cynthia Dubberley, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect; Jenny Pelc, AIA, LEED AP; Amanda Rivera, AIA, LEED AP; Robert Kleinpeter, CSI, CCS, RA; Jason Richards, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; Dru Lamb, IIDA, LEED AP, David Demsey; Thaddeus Zarse; Cecile Richards, IIDA, LEED AP; Wendy Kerrigan. Contractor: Satterfield and Pontikes Construction Group. Engineering: Moses Engineers (MEP/FP Engineer); Schrenk & Peterson (Structural/Civil Engineer). Kitchen: Futch Design Associates. Landscape: Daly Sublette. Acoustician: Gracenote Consulting. Furniture dealer: Louisiana School Equipment Company. Photographer: Timothy Hursley.

what
Wallcoverings: MDC. Paneling: 9-Wood. Solid surfacing: American Tile & Terrazzo. Special surfacing: Trespa. Floor and wall tile: Daltile. Paint: Sherwin-Williams. Laminate: Wilsonart. Flooring: Armstrong, Walkable Ceiling Grid, Roppe. Carpet/carpet tile: Karistan, Bentley Prince Street. Ceilings: Hunter Douglas Contract, USG. Interior ambient lighting: Corelite, Guth, Winona, Cooper. Downlights: Corelite, Guth, Winona, Cooper. Exterior lighting: Winona, Cooper, Froms-Surfaces. Dimming System/other lighting controls: Wattstopper. Doors: Kawneer, Ceco, Marshfield, Kawneer, Cornell Iron Work. Fire-control doors, security grilles: Won-door, Vetrotech Saint-Gobain. Glass: Viracon; Vanceva. Skylights: Solatube. Window treatments: Kawneer. Lockers: LSI Corporation. Lounge seating: Trespa. Fixed seating/bleachers: Irwin Seating Company. Architectural woodworking: Campbell Rhea, Louisiana School Eq. Plumbing fixtures: Lochinvar, American Standard, Sloan, Haws Co. Whiteboard: Newline. Dance Floor: Harlequin. Stage Floor: Armstrong. Elevators/Escalators: Thyssen Krupp. Energy management or building automation system: Trane. Vault Door: Diebold. Stage equipment/theater lighting: Texas Scenic Co. Activboard: Promethean. Generator: Cummins. Fume Hoods: BMC, Inc. Special interior finishes: Trenwyth Astra Glaze.

where
Location: New Orleans, La. Total floor area: 236,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 3. Average floor size: 71,344 sq. ft. Cost/sq. ft. $232.




Community Asset: L.B. Landry High School by Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

14 March, 2011


Timothy Hursley

Five years after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, and flooded 80 percent of the city and virtually destroyed its public school system, it is heartening to see the new beginnings that are emerging in the wake of the devastation. One inspiring fresh start is the reconstruction of the L.B. Landry High School in a working-class neighborhood of New Orleans. Designed by New Orleans-based architecture firm Eskew+Dumez+Ripple, the new school is one of five projects selected as part of the Louisiana Department of Education’s Recovery School District’s “Quick Start” program, which aimed to fast-forward the replacement of five damaged schools while the new comprehensive plan for the city’s school system was underway. Supported with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the brand new $54.8-million facility, which opened last August, not only promises to enhance the quality of education for the students, but also to improve the quality of life for the community.

Driven by a passionate community group, the proposal to rebuild L.B. Landry was the largest chosen to receive funding to rebuild from among approximately 70 applicants because of its place in New Orleans’ history. Although it hadn’t been destroyed by flooding, the original school—which was built in 1938 and was the first public school on New Orleans’ west bank that African Americans could attend—suffered wind damage, had deteriorated badly over the years, and was too small to accommodate its current and projected student body. But thanks to a committed alumni and neighborhood advocacy group, the 236,000-sq.-ft. school was rebuilt on its original site and now incorporates 50 percent more space than the old school.

Working with SHW, a Texas-based architecture firm specializing in education design, and program manager CSRS, Inc., Eskew+Dumez+Ripple designed the new school to meet the criteria of the Louisiana Recovery School District, which mandated contemporary standards for education planning and LEED Silver status for all schools. It also was designed with input from civic leaders to function as a community resource. “Beyond all of the curriculum components of the design, the community also wanted two gyms—one for competition and another for practice—as well as a health clinic and media center that would function as community resources after hours,” says architect Steve Dumez. As a result, in addition to expanded, up-to-date classroom spaces, the school now houses two new gymnasiums (one 1,000-seat, competition-size space and another 250-seat auxiliary gym); a 650-seat auditorium; a spacious cafeteria; performing arts spaces for dance, choir, and band rehearsal; and a black box theater, as well as a community health center and new public media space, both of which offer after-school access to the general public.

“The community was extremely supportive of Landry being rebuilt,” says Siona LaFrance, chief of staff for the Recovery School District. “Designed with the idea that parts of it would be accessible and available to the community, including the health clinic and recreational and performance space, it is considered a real asset to the community.”

To improve on the plan of the original two-story school, which was designed around a courtyard and closed on all four sides, the architects opted to preserve the original courtyard (including a very old magnolia tree), but replaced the former, donut-shaped plan with a U-shaped one to open the side of the facility facing L.B. Landry Avenue, a major thoroughfare to the west. “We wanted to open the heart of the school to the street so that students could see out to the world beyond and passersby could see in,” says Dumez. To make up for the loss of space along the open side of the school and expand the square footage, the architects created a three-story structure with two classroom wings for different grade levels on the sides and clustered the support and common spaces in the center. For easy access and security, the community health clinic and media center were located on the ground level of each of the classroom wings.

The orientation of the wings and the fenestration are part of a daylighting strategy designed to support the building’s sustainability objectives. “It was very important to bring daylight into the classrooms and common areas,” says architect Tracy Lea, “so the windows respond to solar orientation and allow the circulation and gathering areas to be as open and light as they can be while controlling heat gain.” Another eco-friendly feature—a pre-cast concrete storm water management basin that’s filled with horsetail reeds and gravel and doubles as outdoor seating adjacent to the courtyard—is one of many components that enable the building itself to become a teaching tool about sustainable design.

The community’s interest in durability and ease of maintenance influenced the materials choices for the building. “New Orleans Parish hadn’t built any new schools in a while, so there were no standards from an aesthetic perspective,” says Dumez. “Because L.B. Landry was one of the first schools coming out of the box, we were able to help established new standards.” Outside, masonry units from the ground level to the second floors and insulated metal wall panels above establish a crisp, tough shell. Inside, terrazzo floors, impact-resistant blue-tinted laminated glass window insets, and walls clad in durable yellow wallpaper printed with inspirational quotes from African American leaders brighten common areas with echoes of the original structure and the school’s blue and yellow colors. Since opening last summer, the new school quickly has become a source of a pride and a symbol of hope for a passionate community that respects its hardworking past and is committed to its successful future.


who
Client: Louisiana Recovery School38District. Architect, interior designer: Eskew+Dumez+Ripple; Steve Dumez, FAIA – Design Director; Tracy Lea, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Director; Randy Hutchison, Senior Designer/Contract Administrator; Cynthia Dubberley, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect; Jenny Pelc, AIA, LEED AP; Amanda Rivera, AIA, LEED AP; Robert Kleinpeter, CSI, CCS, RA; Jason Richards, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; Dru Lamb, IIDA, LEED AP, David Demsey; Thaddeus Zarse; Cecile Richards, IIDA, LEED AP; Wendy Kerrigan. Contractor: Satterfield and Pontikes Construction Group. Engineering: Moses Engineers (MEP/FP Engineer); Schrenk & Peterson (Structural/Civil Engineer). Kitchen: Futch Design Associates. Landscape: Daly Sublette. Acoustician: Gracenote Consulting. Furniture dealer: Louisiana School Equipment Company. Photographer: Timothy Hursley.

what
Wallcoverings: MDC. Paneling: 9-Wood. Solid surfacing: American Tile & Terrazzo. Special surfacing: Trespa. Floor and wall tile: Daltile. Paint: Sherwin-Williams. Laminate: Wilsonart. Flooring: Armstrong, Walkable Ceiling Grid, Roppe. Carpet/carpet tile: Karistan, Bentley Prince Street. Ceilings: Hunter Douglas Contract, USG. Interior ambient lighting: Corelite, Guth, Winona, Cooper. Downlights: Corelite, Guth, Winona, Cooper. Exterior lighting: Winona, Cooper, Froms-Surfaces. Dimming System/other lighting controls: Wattstopper. Doors: Kawneer, Ceco, Marshfield, Kawneer, Cornell Iron Work. Fire-control doors, security grilles: Won-door, Vetrotech Saint-Gobain. Glass: Viracon; Vanceva. Skylights: Solatube. Window treatments: Kawneer. Lockers: LSI Corporation. Lounge seating: Trespa. Fixed seating/bleachers: Irwin Seating Company. Architectural woodworking: Campbell Rhea, Louisiana School Eq. Plumbing fixtures: Lochinvar, American Standard, Sloan, Haws Co. Whiteboard: Newline. Dance Floor: Harlequin. Stage Floor: Armstrong. Elevators/Escalators: Thyssen Krupp. Energy management or building automation system: Trane. Vault Door: Diebold. Stage equipment/theater lighting: Texas Scenic Co. Activboard: Promethean. Generator: Cummins. Fume Hoods: BMC, Inc. Special interior finishes: Trenwyth Astra Glaze.

where
Location: New Orleans, La. Total floor area: 236,000 sq. ft. No. of floors: 3. Average floor size: 71,344 sq. ft. Cost/sq. ft. $232.

 


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