Contract - Interiors Awards 2014: Restaurant

design - features - hospitality design



Interiors Awards 2014: Restaurant

24 January, 2014

-By Russell Fortmeyer. Photography by Barbara Kraft Photography


Andrea’s at Encore
Designer: TAL Studio
Client: Wynn Resorts
Location: Las Vegas

“Andrea’s has a very sophisticated point of view—a chic formality about dining. The use of color and lighting is masterful and drips of luxury. It is a memorable space, and creating that can be challenging in the Vegas hospitality scene.” -Jury

Andrea’s at the Encore Resort at Wynn Las Vegas takes a decidedly social turn from the typical casino restaurant. Instead of an interior with huge, theatrical set-pieces and over-the-top thematic elements, the restaurant’s lighting, color palette, and materials flatter both the presentation of its food and the visages of its glamorous patrons from every angle.

For interior designer Todd-Avery Lenahan of Las Vegas–based TAL Studio, the nearly 200-seat restaurant continues a series of successful projects he has completed for one of the city’s best-known personalities, Steve Wynn. Lenahan says the Wynn brand eschews trends and instead focuses on artistry in service of fashion while maintaining a clear business objective. In this case, Andrea’s was conceived to align with the clientele drawn to the adjacent Surrender Nightclub and Encore Beach Club venues, as well as to create a lively atmosphere for guests who would prefer to let loose over food and drinks as an evening’s main event. The banquette seating allows for easy shifts between couples and larger groups out on the town.

“We created five different micro-environments that enforce a lot of interaction between the guests,” Lenahan says. “We avoided a static quality to the space, it’s about moving around, seeing and being seen, meeting people, and looking at people you’d like to meet.” To guarantee people are seen, the restaurant features a pair of continuously changing eyes projected from a 15-foot-long LED panel, created by theatrical designer Michael Curry and installed on a wood veneer-sheathed wall behind the bar. The eyes belong to the restaurant’s namesake, Steve Wynn’s wife, Andrea.

In addition, Lenahan devised three main paths, which he compares to runways, that allow movement through the main dining area. One extends from the bar to the sushi kitchen, a second runs along the bar, and a third is adjacent to a series of enclosed alcove booths along the east wall. “People aren’t weaving through this space, but there is always a sense of procession for how people move through the room,” Lenahan says.

A strictly neutral color palette of cream, gold, and cognac keeps the focus on the food and people. Indirect and diffused warm-toned LED lighting, designed by Wynn Design and Development, defines the restaurant’s curvilinear details and casts guests like Hollywood stars. Venetian glass teardrop chandeliers, designed by Lenahan, incorporate single LED lights into each piece of glass to create a sparkling effect. Fixtures integrated beneath seating create a soft glow under the tables. For the dining room, Lenahan selected Brueton chairs fitted with gold-colored leather, since their elegantly curved, polished stainless-steel frames won’t compete with women’s “killer shoes,” as the designer says.  

Throughout the restaurant, surfaces reflect the glow from light fixtures in varying intensities. Lounge areas feature hammered brass tables by Eric Brand. Lasvit cast glass panels with a midcentury- inspired looping pattern cover the east wall. Each alcove along the wall is framed with shimmering screens made of chains of polished aluminum spheres, inspired by the Four Seasons restaurant in New York. Artist Matt Richards created white mobiles, reminiscent of work by Alexander Calder, that hang above each alcove table. Candelabras echo the 1966 chandeliers designed by Hans Harald Rath for the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. A limestone floor brings texture with alternating polished and matte finishes, while a butterfly patterned onyx wall at the entrance to the kitchen suggests a midcentury Miesian aesthetic.

Andrea’s has been a huge success for the hotel, says the restaurant’s managing partner, Sean Christie. “We wanted a restaurant that would make you look good, feel good, and appeal to women without scaring off the men,” says Christie, who also runs the nearby Wynn nightclubs. “I think Todd’s design nails that perfectly.”




Interiors Awards 2014: Restaurant

24 January, 2014


Andrea’s at Encore
Designer: TAL Studio
Client: Wynn Resorts
Location: Las Vegas

“Andrea’s has a very sophisticated point of view—a chic formality about dining. The use of color and lighting is masterful and drips of luxury. It is a memorable space, and creating that can be challenging in the Vegas hospitality scene.” -Jury

Andrea’s at the Encore Resort at Wynn Las Vegas takes a decidedly social turn from the typical casino restaurant. Instead of an interior with huge, theatrical set-pieces and over-the-top thematic elements, the restaurant’s lighting, color palette, and materials flatter both the presentation of its food and the visages of its glamorous patrons from every angle.

For interior designer Todd-Avery Lenahan of Las Vegas–based TAL Studio, the nearly 200-seat restaurant continues a series of successful projects he has completed for one of the city’s best-known personalities, Steve Wynn. Lenahan says the Wynn brand eschews trends and instead focuses on artistry in service of fashion while maintaining a clear business objective. In this case, Andrea’s was conceived to align with the clientele drawn to the adjacent Surrender Nightclub and Encore Beach Club venues, as well as to create a lively atmosphere for guests who would prefer to let loose over food and drinks as an evening’s main event. The banquette seating allows for easy shifts between couples and larger groups out on the town.

“We created five different micro-environments that enforce a lot of interaction between the guests,” Lenahan says. “We avoided a static quality to the space, it’s about moving around, seeing and being seen, meeting people, and looking at people you’d like to meet.” To guarantee people are seen, the restaurant features a pair of continuously changing eyes projected from a 15-foot-long LED panel, created by theatrical designer Michael Curry and installed on a wood veneer-sheathed wall behind the bar. The eyes belong to the restaurant’s namesake, Steve Wynn’s wife, Andrea.

In addition, Lenahan devised three main paths, which he compares to runways, that allow movement through the main dining area. One extends from the bar to the sushi kitchen, a second runs along the bar, and a third is adjacent to a series of enclosed alcove booths along the east wall. “People aren’t weaving through this space, but there is always a sense of procession for how people move through the room,” Lenahan says.

A strictly neutral color palette of cream, gold, and cognac keeps the focus on the food and people. Indirect and diffused warm-toned LED lighting, designed by Wynn Design and Development, defines the restaurant’s curvilinear details and casts guests like Hollywood stars. Venetian glass teardrop chandeliers, designed by Lenahan, incorporate single LED lights into each piece of glass to create a sparkling effect. Fixtures integrated beneath seating create a soft glow under the tables. For the dining room, Lenahan selected Brueton chairs fitted with gold-colored leather, since their elegantly curved, polished stainless-steel frames won’t compete with women’s “killer shoes,” as the designer says.  

Throughout the restaurant, surfaces reflect the glow from light fixtures in varying intensities. Lounge areas feature hammered brass tables by Eric Brand. Lasvit cast glass panels with a midcentury- inspired looping pattern cover the east wall. Each alcove along the wall is framed with shimmering screens made of chains of polished aluminum spheres, inspired by the Four Seasons restaurant in New York. Artist Matt Richards created white mobiles, reminiscent of work by Alexander Calder, that hang above each alcove table. Candelabras echo the 1966 chandeliers designed by Hans Harald Rath for the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. A limestone floor brings texture with alternating polished and matte finishes, while a butterfly patterned onyx wall at the entrance to the kitchen suggests a midcentury Miesian aesthetic.

Andrea’s has been a huge success for the hotel, says the restaurant’s managing partner, Sean Christie. “We wanted a restaurant that would make you look good, feel good, and appeal to women without scaring off the men,” says Christie, who also runs the nearby Wynn nightclubs. “I think Todd’s design nails that perfectly.”

 


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