Contract - Interiors Awards 2014: Student

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Interiors Awards 2014: Student

24 January, 2014

-By Cody Calamaio


Annie Masincupp
School: Savannah College of Art and Design
Proposed Location: Atlanta


“She takes on a real problem, and addresses it in a way that is grounded in reality while being aspirational. The project was part of an adaptive reuse idea in an existing structure, and it’s executed very well. A culture could pop up around nodes such as this.” -Jury


For her senior capstone project at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), Annie Masincupp was directed to create a project that solves a problem for the community. Masincupp, who completed her Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design in the spring of 2013, decided to tackle the issue of automobile dependency by creating a transportation hub centered around the needs and culture of bike commuters. She chose to locate her project in Atlanta: a city that was designed around the car, but that was seeking to become more cyclist-friendly with a commitment to new bike lanes.

“I felt it would embrace the future culture of Atlanta,” she says. Masincupp conceived a 31,000 square foot facility that serves as a transportation center for cyclists, and provides them with a place to store their bikes and connect to other forms of public transportation, such as buses or Atlanta’s MARTA rapid-transit system. By imagining the project as part of an existing building at 1314 Peachtree Street NE, she could utilize connections to existing transportation infrastructure. “I wanted to make it as efficient as possible,” Masincupp says.

The project addressed the unique challenge of accommodating people who are riding or walking their bikes throughout the facility. A large lobby on the first floor is kept mostly open to funnel crowds during the busy rush hour. The lobby’s columns are wrapped in interactive gesture-controlled panels that allow cyclists to map their route, discover new destinations, and register for bike and car sharing systems, utilizing an underground car parking lot. “It was fun to embrace design challenges—that is what design is all about,” Masincupp says. “Not just addressing, ‘how does a person use this?’, but ‘how does a person with a bike use this?’”

There are two areas for bike parking: an area for members located conveniently off the main lobby, and a free parking area on the second level, accessible by elevators or a ramp that allows users to easily maneuver their bikes. The free bike storage area is flanked by retail stores and a bike repair shop. The third level has lockers, showers, changing rooms, and a cafe, which features multiple seating choices that promote mobility, including bar-height tables that allow cyclists use their bikes as seats.

When making material selections, Masincupp embraced concepts of sustainability, durability, and disassembly, sourcing non-slip tile, sustainable wood flooring, recycled rubber, and recycled metal shavings used for the countertops of public areas.

Masincupp also explored her love for branding and graphic design with large, three-dimensional signage that uses words derived from bike parts to create zones, such as “gear,” which distinguishes the retail area. Pops of orange, yellow, and green are used to differentiate each level and contribute to wayfinding, while keeping the space feeling raw and industrial. “The place will get dirty, it’s not going to be a pristine place,” she says.

Masincupp also won SCAD’s Outstanding Capstone Project honor for this project. She is now a practicing interior designer in the Washington, D.C., area.




Interiors Awards 2014: Student

24 January, 2014


Annie Masincupp
School: Savannah College of Art and Design
Proposed Location: Atlanta


“She takes on a real problem, and addresses it in a way that is grounded in reality while being aspirational. The project was part of an adaptive reuse idea in an existing structure, and it’s executed very well. A culture could pop up around nodes such as this.” -Jury


For her senior capstone project at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), Annie Masincupp was directed to create a project that solves a problem for the community. Masincupp, who completed her Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design in the spring of 2013, decided to tackle the issue of automobile dependency by creating a transportation hub centered around the needs and culture of bike commuters. She chose to locate her project in Atlanta: a city that was designed around the car, but that was seeking to become more cyclist-friendly with a commitment to new bike lanes.

“I felt it would embrace the future culture of Atlanta,” she says. Masincupp conceived a 31,000 square foot facility that serves as a transportation center for cyclists, and provides them with a place to store their bikes and connect to other forms of public transportation, such as buses or Atlanta’s MARTA rapid-transit system. By imagining the project as part of an existing building at 1314 Peachtree Street NE, she could utilize connections to existing transportation infrastructure. “I wanted to make it as efficient as possible,” Masincupp says.

The project addressed the unique challenge of accommodating people who are riding or walking their bikes throughout the facility. A large lobby on the first floor is kept mostly open to funnel crowds during the busy rush hour. The lobby’s columns are wrapped in interactive gesture-controlled panels that allow cyclists to map their route, discover new destinations, and register for bike and car sharing systems, utilizing an underground car parking lot. “It was fun to embrace design challenges—that is what design is all about,” Masincupp says. “Not just addressing, ‘how does a person use this?’, but ‘how does a person with a bike use this?’”

There are two areas for bike parking: an area for members located conveniently off the main lobby, and a free parking area on the second level, accessible by elevators or a ramp that allows users to easily maneuver their bikes. The free bike storage area is flanked by retail stores and a bike repair shop. The third level has lockers, showers, changing rooms, and a cafe, which features multiple seating choices that promote mobility, including bar-height tables that allow cyclists use their bikes as seats.

When making material selections, Masincupp embraced concepts of sustainability, durability, and disassembly, sourcing non-slip tile, sustainable wood flooring, recycled rubber, and recycled metal shavings used for the countertops of public areas.

Masincupp also explored her love for branding and graphic design with large, three-dimensional signage that uses words derived from bike parts to create zones, such as “gear,” which distinguishes the retail area. Pops of orange, yellow, and green are used to differentiate each level and contribute to wayfinding, while keeping the space feeling raw and industrial. “The place will get dirty, it’s not going to be a pristine place,” she says.

Masincupp also won SCAD’s Outstanding Capstone Project honor for this project. She is now a practicing interior designer in the Washington, D.C., area.

 


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