Contract - Winners of the Inspirations Awards Announced

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Winners of the Inspirations Awards Announced

08 June, 2014

-By Staff



The winners of the 2014 Inspirations Awards—sponsored by Tandus Centiva and presented by Contract—were announced in a ceremony on June 8 in the Tandus Centiva showroom in Chicago. The awards recognize a commitment to social responsibility in commercial interiors, using design to improve the quality of life for those in need. 

Winners of the sixth annual Inspirations Awards were recognized for their work completed for clients that are a worthy cause. The clients, in turn, received a generous grant from award sponsor Tandus Centiva. Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity in St. Paul, Minnesota, by Gensler’s Minneapolis office received a $5,000 grant in the built project category, and the Hawai’i Wildlife Center by Ruhl Walker Architects received a $1,000 grant in the practice-based initiative category. Since the inception of the Inspirations Awards in 2009, nearly $50,000 in grants have been awarded.

The 2014 competition jurors were: Katherine Darnstadt, AIA, founder and principal of Latent Design; Kim Hong, IIDA, interior design director at granum a/i; and Paul LaBrant, IIDA, director of interior design at GSC Architects.

The 2014 winners are:   

Project Category Winner

Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity by Gensler (Minneapolis)

Project location: St. Paul, Minnesota

$5,000 Grant Award

The new home for Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity creates a neighborhood hub for housing resources in the community. The design by the Minneapolis office of Gensler is inspired by local examples of affordable residential shelters and the urban context of St. Paul. Developed on a former brownfield site, the design is functional, and draws from influences of culture and community. The jury praised the project’s blending of architecture and interiors, calling the approach “very comfortable” with design that “celebrates community pride and individual pride.”

 

Practice Category Winner

Hawai`i Wildlife Center by Ruhl Walker Architects (Boston)

Project location: Halaula, Hawaii

$1,000 Grant Award

This project is the first wildlife recovery and rehabilitation center in Hawai’i dedicated to the islands’ endangered native wildlife through hands-on treatment, research training, and scientific, environmental, and cultural programs. Design services were pro bono with donated materials and collaboration with the community. The building’s form is an abstraction of the archetypal Hawaiian commercial architecture, with a strong formal presence that speaks to the seriousness of the organization‘s mission. The jury was inspired by the restraint used in the design that allowed the organization to reach its goals. “The editing eye and appropriate use of materials was very keen on this project,” the jury said. “We enjoyed the project from a full-story perspective of educating the community about not only wildlife, but also about how architecture can respond to a site and its environment.”

 

Project Category Honorable Mention

American Red Cross by SmithGroupJJR (San Francisco)

Project location: San Francisco

The new San Francisco headquarters for the American Red Cross represents a shift in work style for the organization due to its open plan with no private offices. Spread across two floors and a mezzanine level, the flexible space encompasses everyday work and serves an emergency disaster control center. “Consistent with the company’s ethos, it is humble and straightforward,” the jury said. “One might think that nonprofits always have to have spaces of secondary quality, and this works counter to that mind-set.”

 

Practice Category Honorable Mention

Artists for Humanity by Artaic (Boston)

Project location: Boston

Artists for Humanity is a nonprofit that bridges economic, racial, and social divisions by providing under-resourced youth with the keys to self-sufficiency through paid employment in the arts. The organization started in 1991 as a way to inspire inner-city middle school students through visual arts. In a collaboration with Artaic, teens are partnered with designers to create original mosaics inspired by urban life. The jury enjoyed how the project used the concept of graffiti to “empower youth to use those energies in a positive manner. It's about conversations of art and technology and the elevation of a material that transforms communities.” 




Winners of the Inspirations Awards Announced

08 June, 2014


The winners of the 2014 Inspirations Awards—sponsored by Tandus Centiva and presented by Contract—were announced in a ceremony on June 8 in the Tandus Centiva showroom in Chicago. The awards recognize a commitment to social responsibility in commercial interiors, using design to improve the quality of life for those in need. 

Winners of the sixth annual Inspirations Awards were recognized for their work completed for clients that are a worthy cause. The clients, in turn, received a generous grant from award sponsor Tandus Centiva. Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity in St. Paul, Minnesota, by Gensler’s Minneapolis office received a $5,000 grant in the built project category, and the Hawai’i Wildlife Center by Ruhl Walker Architects received a $1,000 grant in the practice-based initiative category. Since the inception of the Inspirations Awards in 2009, nearly $50,000 in grants have been awarded.

The 2014 competition jurors were: Katherine Darnstadt, AIA, founder and principal of Latent Design; Kim Hong, IIDA, interior design director at granum a/i; and Paul LaBrant, IIDA, director of interior design at GSC Architects.

The 2014 winners are:   

Project Category Winner

Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity by Gensler (Minneapolis)

Project location: St. Paul, Minnesota

$5,000 Grant Award

The new home for Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity creates a neighborhood hub for housing resources in the community. The design by the Minneapolis office of Gensler is inspired by local examples of affordable residential shelters and the urban context of St. Paul. Developed on a former brownfield site, the design is functional, and draws from influences of culture and community. The jury praised the project’s blending of architecture and interiors, calling the approach “very comfortable” with design that “celebrates community pride and individual pride.”

 

Practice Category Winner

Hawai`i Wildlife Center by Ruhl Walker Architects (Boston)

Project location: Halaula, Hawaii

$1,000 Grant Award

This project is the first wildlife recovery and rehabilitation center in Hawai’i dedicated to the islands’ endangered native wildlife through hands-on treatment, research training, and scientific, environmental, and cultural programs. Design services were pro bono with donated materials and collaboration with the community. The building’s form is an abstraction of the archetypal Hawaiian commercial architecture, with a strong formal presence that speaks to the seriousness of the organization‘s mission. The jury was inspired by the restraint used in the design that allowed the organization to reach its goals. “The editing eye and appropriate use of materials was very keen on this project,” the jury said. “We enjoyed the project from a full-story perspective of educating the community about not only wildlife, but also about how architecture can respond to a site and its environment.”

 

Project Category Honorable Mention

American Red Cross by SmithGroupJJR (San Francisco)

Project location: San Francisco

The new San Francisco headquarters for the American Red Cross represents a shift in work style for the organization due to its open plan with no private offices. Spread across two floors and a mezzanine level, the flexible space encompasses everyday work and serves an emergency disaster control center. “Consistent with the company’s ethos, it is humble and straightforward,” the jury said. “One might think that nonprofits always have to have spaces of secondary quality, and this works counter to that mind-set.”

 

Practice Category Honorable Mention

Artists for Humanity by Artaic (Boston)

Project location: Boston

Artists for Humanity is a nonprofit that bridges economic, racial, and social divisions by providing under-resourced youth with the keys to self-sufficiency through paid employment in the arts. The organization started in 1991 as a way to inspire inner-city middle school students through visual arts. In a collaboration with Artaic, teens are partnered with designers to create original mosaics inspired by urban life. The jury enjoyed how the project used the concept of graffiti to “empower youth to use those energies in a positive manner. It's about conversations of art and technology and the elevation of a material that transforms communities.” 

 


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