2016 Aga Khan Award for Architecture Winners Announced

Natural light dynamically enters the Bait ur Rouf Mosque in Bangladesh. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust Culture/Rajesh Vora.

The winners of the 2016 Aga Khan Award for Architecture have been announced. The annual awards were first established in 1977 to honor projects and concepts that served the needs of Muslims across the globe. Located in Denmark, China, Iran, Bangladesh, and Lebanon, the six winners were selected from a shortlist of 19 projects. The nine-person jury included architects David Adjaye and Dominique Perrault, as well as His Highness the Aga Khan.

This year’s winning projects include:

The Bait ur Rouf Mosque in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Designed by Bangladesh-based firm Marina Tabassum Architects, the brick structure was chosen for its dynamic use of natural light.


The Bait ur Rouf Mosque. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust for Culture/Rajesh Vora.

The Friendship Centre in Gaibandham Bangladesh. Designed by Kashef Mahboob Chowdhury/URBANA, the cruciform community center is embanked, creating a unique connection between the architecture and the flatland environment. 



The Friendship Centre. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust for Culture/Rajesh Vora.

The Hutong Children’s Library and Art Centre in Beijing. Chinese firm ZAO/standardarchitecture crafted the building to embody the principles of traditional courtyard residences found along Beijing’s narrow hutongs.


The Hutong Children’s Library and Art Centre. Image courtesy of AKTC/Zhang MingMing, ZAO, standardarchitecture.

The kilometer-long Superkilen urban park in Copenhagen. A collaboration between BIG, Berlin-based landscape designer Topotek 1, and Danish artist collective Superflex. The public space was chosen for its promotion of integrating multiple cultural, religious, and ethnic lines through its design.


Superkilen. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust for Culture/Kristian Skeie.

The Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge in Tehran. Designed by local firm Diba Tensile Architecture, the multilevel bridge marks a new urban space as well as an effective motorway.


Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust for Culture/Barzin Baharlouie.

The Issam Fares Institute in Beirut. The latest addition to the American University of Beirut’s campus, the radically composed structure from Zaha Hadid Architects was created to adhere to the campus’ traditional contexts while also making its own dramatic statement.


The Issam Fares Institute. Image courtesy of Aga Khan Trust for Culture/Cemal Emden.