Elizabeth de Portzamparc Completes New Musée de la Romanité in Nîmes, France

The exterior is clad with 6,708 glass strips that each hold seven square-printed tiles. All images courtesy Serge Urvoy/Aldo Ancieta/Ville de Nîmes.

Architect Elizabeth de Portzamparc has completed work on the new home of the Musée de la Romanité in Nîmes, France. Set to accommodate the museum collections upon opening in 2018, the structure boasts a unique, undulating facade that engages in a dialogue with the city’s many Roman monuments.

Image courtesy Serge Urvoy/Aldo Ancieta/Ville de Nîmes.

The building’s horizontal undulations highlight the lightness of the overall design, and draw inspiration from the Roman mosaics featured in the museum’s collection. The 26,900-square-foot surface is clad with 6,708 glass strips, which each hold seven square-printed tiles.

Image courtesy Serge Urvoy/Aldo Ancieta/Ville de Nîmes.

A wide interior avenue is installed between the entrance hall and a café to connect visitors to the archaeological garden. The semi-public passage establishes a visual opening and reveals a roman axis that links the remains with the narrative of Roman Arenas. The museum also features an atrium of more than 50 feet in height as well as a vertical promenade experienced via Chambord stairs and a series of ramps that allow elevated views of the collection. Wide windows maintain a visual context, while a rooftop garden and terrace round out the experience with a panoramic view of the surroundings.